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For the first time in nearly five months, visitors will be allowed in Texas nursing homes on a limited basis, state health officials announced Thursday evening, reversing a policy intended to keep the state’s most vulnerable populations safe from a pandemic that has proved especially deadly …

Over the past few weeks, at least 187 Texans received unsolicited packages of mystery seeds in the mail that appeared to have come from China. Meanwhile, all 50 states have issued warnings about similar bundles of unknown seeds being sent to residents from overseas, causing concern among government officials and agricultural leaders.

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Accurate and up-to-date coronavirus data is critical — not just for informing the officials making policy, but for parents trying to decide whether to send their kids to day care and business owners wondering whether to reopen their stores.

Ed Sterling wrote this column for almost three decades, so let’s open by celebrating his contributions to the Texas Press Association and its members. Ed was the calm, steady voice keeping us informed and interested.

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Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar delivered bleak but unsurprising news Monday: Because of the economic fallout triggered by the coronavirus pandemic, the amount of general revenue available for the state’s current two-year budget is projected to be roughly $11.5 billion less than originally estimated. That puts the state on track to end the biennium, which runs through August 2021, with a deficit of nearly $4.6 billion, Hegar said.

NEW YORK (AP) — Conservative-leaning faith leaders and their allies, outspoken in recent years about what they consider infringements on religious liberties, cheered Wednesday as the Supreme Court issued a pair of rulings that protected certain rights of religious employers.

Nearly 6,300 Texas-based companies received loans from the federal government valued at more than $1 million this spring, representing a major injection of government money into the state as the federal government was straining to keep the economy afloat.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — As the nation wrestles with how to do more for racial equality, Liberty University — a school whose leadership has said it doesn't have a problem — is facing its own tough questions.

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Amtrak said it will cut service beginning in October on its Texas Eagle route through Longview and Marshall — and on other long-distance trains — from daily to three times a week because ridership has fallen significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic.